Welcome to Vintage Los Angeles

Alison Martino is a Los Angeles-based television producer, columnist for Los Angeles Magazine and lifelong resident of the city. Alison’s current social media reach is over 800,000 and growing. Her zeal for history and lifelong penchant for collecting has resulted in one of the largest collections of restaurant memorabilia, photographs, postcards, and matchbooks. Her deep knowledge of Hollywood history and personal acquaintances throughout the industry has resulted in features about Alison on ABC’s Eye on L.A., The Travel Channel, NPR Radio, The Huffington Post, CurbedLA, The New York Times, and the nationally syndicated show, The Insider. In December of 2015, she also landed on the cover of West Hollywood Magazine. 2017 has been a busy year for Alison as she co-produced and stared in a film about the life of Jayne Mansfield (called “Mansfield ’66/’67”) which was featured in 17 film festivals worldwide. Click here to watch the Mansfield ’66/’67 trailer. Alison also recently had the honor of hosting an event at the Aero Theatre where she interviewed Rose Marie, Dick Van Dyke, Peter Marshall and Carl Reiner. On top of all that, she was also recently featured in a commercial for Turner Classic Movies.

Check out Alison’s latest Blog entries here.

Martino’s affection for old Hollywood and her hometown’s architecture led her to create the wildly popular Vintage Los Angeles (VLA)— an ever growing photo-centric Facebook page dedicated to highlighting L.A.’s physical transformation during the 20th Century, as well as its history as the center of the entertainment industry and community. Vintage Los Angeles not only focuses on sharing photos, but also on creating an active online community. Vintage Los Angeles has 278,000 followers on Facebook, and has become a go-to site for commentary and conversation on the entertainment industry and Hollywood history.

Before starting VLA, Alison Martino produced television shows for Bravo, TV Land, A&E, VH1, Lifetime and Ryan Seacrest Productions. She spent five years at E! Entertainment Television producing the classic cult series Mysteries & Scandals, a Hollywood Babylon-esque show which focused on the flip side of fame. For her TV productions and live events, Alison has interviewed dozens of movie star legends and pop culture icons including Dennis Hopper, Jack Lemmon, Cliff Robertson, Steve Allen, Phyllis Diller, Dick Cavett, Betty White, Janet Leigh, Glen Campbell, Nancy Sinatra, Valerie Harper, The Smothers Brothers, Casey Kasem, Roger Corman, Bryan Cranston and the cast of “Dukes of Hazzard.”

The entertainment industry is taking note of the enormous audience Alison has built for VLA and her other social media outlets. To gain access to what Alison has built, Lionsgate engaged her to promote La La Land on the Vintage Los Angeles page, including red-carpet interviews at the film’s premiere. For the 2013 film Gangster Squad, Alison provided Warner Bros. her own vintage Los Angeles memorabilia. She generated a ton of buzz for the Tower Records documentary, All Things Must Pass, directed by Colin Hanks. In 2017, Martino was invited to attend the TCM CLASSIC FILM FESTIVAL. Her coverage was so extensive it led her to partner with the network for future programs, events and movie releases.


 

‘West Hollywood’ magazine feature

Alison Martino's Vintage Los Angeles Alison Martino
Alison recently teamed up with the Ebersole Hughes Company to create the web series VLA TV. She is also media director for Dan Tana’s, a West Hollywood Italian eatery popular with celebrities and locals since 1964. Her passion for this historic restaurant landed her a full-time position promoting its 52 years in business.

Martino is an advocate for historic preservation of the architecture that makes Los Angeles and its surrounding communities like West Hollywood, Beverly Hills and Santa Monica unique, and for the buildings that are iconic representations of the entertainment industry. She worked to bring back the original Chasen’s Chili, helped save vintage signs on Sunset Strip and to preserve the original caricatures on the walls of The Palm Restaurant, and advocated removal of vendor carts that blocked public access to the historic Chinese Theater in Hollywood — a crusade that was spotlighted in the New York Times and Hollywood Reporter.


Welcome to Vintage Los Angeles

Alison Martino Alison Martino is a Los Angeles-based television producer, columnist for Los Angeles Magazine and lifelong resident of the city. Alison’s current social media reach is over 800,000 and growing. Her zeal for history and lifelong penchant for collecting has resulted in one of the largest collections of restaurant memorabilia, photographs, postcards, and matchbooks. Her deep knowledge of Hollywood history and personal acquaintances throughout the industry has resulted in features about Alison on ABC’s Eye on L.A., The Travel Channel, NPR Radio, The Huffington Post, CurbedLA, The New York Times, and the nationally syndicated show, The Insider. In December of 2015, she also landed on the cover of West Hollywood Magazine. 2017 has been a busy year for Alison as she co-produced and stared in a film about the life of Jayne Mansfield (called “Mansfield ’66/’67”) which was featured in 17 film festivals worldwide. Click here to watch the Mansfield ’66/’67 trailer. Alison also recently had the honor of hosting an event at the Aero Theatre where she interviewed Rose Marie, Dick Van Dyke, Peter Marshall and Carl Reiner. On top of all that, she was also recently featured in a commercial for Turner Classic Movies.

Check out Alison’s latest Blog entries here.

Martino’s affection for old Hollywood and her hometown’s architecture led her to create the wildly popular Vintage Los Angeles (VLA)— an ever growing photo-centric Facebook page dedicated to highlighting L.A.’s physical transformation during the 20th Century, as well as its history as the center of the entertainment industry and community. Vintage Los Angeles not only focuses on sharing photos, but also on creating an active online community. Vintage Los Angeles has 278,000 followers on Facebook, and has become a go-to site for commentary and conversation on the entertainment industry and Hollywood history.

Before starting VLA, Alison Martino produced television shows for Bravo, TV Land, A&E, VH1, Lifetime and Ryan Seacrest Productions. She spent five years at E! Entertainment Television producing the classic cult series Mysteries & Scandals, a Hollywood Babylon-esque show which focused on the flip side of fame. For her TV productions and live events, Alison has interviewed dozens of movie star legends and pop culture icons including Dennis Hopper, Jack Lemmon, Cliff Robertson, Steve Allen, Phyllis Diller, Dick Cavett, Betty White, Janet Leigh, Glen Campbell, Nancy Sinatra, Valerie Harper, The Smothers Brothers, Casey Kasem, Roger Corman, Bryan Cranston and the cast of “Dukes of Hazzard.”

The entertainment industry is taking note of the enormous audience Alison has built for VLA and her other social media outlets. To gain access to what Alison has built, Lionsgate engaged her to promote La La Land on the Vintage Los Angeles page, including red-carpet interviews at the film’s premiere. For the 2013 film Gangster Squad, Alison provided Warner Bros. her own vintage Los Angeles memorabilia. She generated a ton of buzz for the Tower Records documentary, All Things Must Pass, directed by Colin Hanks. In 2017, Martino was invited to attend the TCM CLASSIC FILM FESTIVAL. Her coverage was so extensive it led her to partner with the network for future programs, events and movie releases.

Alison Martino

Alison recently teamed up with the Ebersole Hughes Company to create the web series VLA TV. She is also media director for Dan Tana’s, a West Hollywood Italian eatery popular with celebrities and locals since 1964. Her passion for this historic restaurant landed her a full-time position promoting its 52 years in business.

Martino is an advocate for historic preservation of the architecture that makes Los Angeles and its surrounding communities like West Hollywood, Beverly Hills and Santa Monica unique, and for the buildings that are iconic representations of the entertainment industry. She worked to bring back the original Chasen’s Chili, helped save vintage signs on Sunset Strip and to preserve the original caricatures on the walls of The Palm Restaurant, and advocated removal of vendor carts that blocked public access to the historic Chinese Theater in Hollywood — a crusade that was spotlighted in the New York Times and Hollywood Reporter.

‘West Hollywood’ magazine feature

Alison Martino's Vintage Los Angeles 
Vintage Los Angeles is a labor of love,” Alison said. “It is a daily celebration and a historical resource that draws people from all over the world. It’s the next best thing to a time machine.”

What's Happening with Vintage Los Angeles

What’s Happening with Vintage Los Angeles?

5 hours ago

Vintage Los Angeles

"77 Sunset Strip" Snap SnapWarner Bros studio's L.A.-based private eye television series "77 Sunset Strip" was a staple of ABC's Friday night schedule in the late 50s and early 60s. '7... ...

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...it's on at 4am out here...insomnia theatre...

I don't remember Cookie getting promoted, LOL!

The Ginchiest Baby

(Smile) I remember singing and snapin' along in the good ol' days of my Elementary school youth. At school we had a teasin' rhyme for those guys who were jus' growing into their "Coming of age" period. It went something like this..."Kooky Kooky lend me your comb"...(and in response): "chale tamale...go buy your own"...lol.

It comes on here in Atlanta on METV in the wee hours of the morning. I watch it when I can’t sleep. Kooky is so kool!

Haha, my grandmother was a fan of all things American. She particularly loved this show and even named one of her cats after Kooky!

I remember 77 Sunset Strip, along with Surfside 6, and Hawaiian Eye. Connie Stevens starred in Surfside 6 and Hawaiian Eye.

I get it here in Georgia with direct tv,love it! I think the beginning of the show was Dean Martins restaurant Dino's

Loved it. Was being aired recently. Great to see how well dressed the whole cast was and notice all the great character actors making cameos🎥

So glad it's back on TV, even if it's at 4 a.m.! Roger Smith was the first celebrity I ever wrote! Still have the autographed pictures!

It’s on MeTV @ 4:30 a.m. weekdays here in Los Angeles, I DVR it & watch later in the day!

Warner Bro’s please release this series on DVD!

my friend Richard Long was on it

One of the earliest shows of my memory. 🙂

Kookie was okay, but I really, really liked Jeff Spencer (Roger Smith.) I loved that theme song.

We were fascinated by the theme - and driving along the strip trying to find the shooting location.

I’m in love with Efrem Zimbalist Jr. I have 64 episodes recorded on my DVR. Obsessed? Yes!

Bead just watching TCM’s tribute to those who died in 2017. Roger Smith was left out of it.

Loved this show! Kookie, Kookie.

The comb

Where are the reruns?

Never missed an episode.

Loved Kookie (Edd Byrnes).

Kookie, Kookie, lend me your comb.

Snap Snap

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24 hours ago

Vintage Los Angeles

If you could time-travel to ANY restaurant that is no longer here, what would it be? One of mine would be Trader Vic's. LET'S HEAR YOURS AND WHY? GO!

(And VLA just might be able to produce a photo of it too!!)
...

If you could time-travel to ANY restaurant that is no longer here, what would it be? One of mine would be Trader Vics. LETS HEAR YOURS AND WHY? GO! 

(And VLA just might be able to produce a photo of it too!!)

 

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The Cocoanut Grove at the Ambassador Hotel. Because it is the epitome of Hollywood Regency. Dining, Dancing, Cocktails, and Music.

The Tea Room at Bullock's Wilshire, during one of their daily luncheon fashion shows.

The Luau. My dad worked there but I never came in to eat. But I met Elvis one night, I was in my pajamas, and he & his entourage were in the back private room. I would go back in time & park myself at the lagoon bar.

The original Spago on Horn with the funky water feature and Nancy Silverton serving up desserts and bread!

I've been thinking about Scandia, all the Christmas gigs we sang there when I was in college choir. Christmas Eve was special, because the owner would put out deli platters for us in the upper conference room. Then the group who had their annual dinner in the "wine cellar" would tip us every time we came in.

So many places I miss and/or missed out on. Since I live down the street, I'd have to say The Brown Derby.

I would say Trader Vic's too.

I'd love a Suffering Bastard or Dr Funk's Son from Trader Vic's.

It's a tie between Le Dome & Perinos. Why, because as a little girl, I loved to read about old Hollywood glam history and those two restaurants intrigued me. I could just imagine the old school stars showing up in their furs and dripping in diamonds. Then Perinos had those fashion shows during lunch...WOW! How utterly fabulous it must have been. Honorable mention on this time travel adventure is Ciro's.

The hat-shaped Brown Derby on Wilshire. I'm pretty sure it's the last place I ate a "black and blue" filet mignon, just before I started on the path to becoming a vegetarian!!!!

Chasens! I know everyone loved the Chili, but thinking of the cheesebread makes me drool. And Mrs. Chasen was just a class act in every way.

Ed Debevics! Loved that place as a teen. Sad I never got to take my kids

Fish Shanty! Reason? The entrance scared the hell out of me when I was a kid, and I would like the opportunity to tackle that fear. When I was a little kid I literally invented the moonwalk years before Michael Jackson, cause I distinctly remember walking away from the restaurant while my father was dragging me back in by the waist of my pants.

Hamburger Hamlet on Beverly Drive, where we survived an earthquake in the 1970s 🙂 I like that the owners of Killer Shrimp are attempting a revival of the Hamlet on Van Nuys near Ventura in Sherman Oaks, but it's still not the same. I want my knockwurst and sauerkraut.

Bahooka Restaurant in Rosemead. I loved their shipwreck theme with all those fish tanks!

The Four Oaks. Coldwater Canyon, I think. Oh, and Val’s on Riverside in Toluca Lake.

Great memories of upstairs at The Aware Inn

Sneeky Pete's and Ollie Hammonds 🙂

I stole a couple of ceramic coconut mugs.

Players Club with Preston Sturges in house

Definitely Scandia and La Brasserie

Playboy Club in the ABC entertainment center (and not being 8 years old 😥)

So many to choose from, but I'm with you! "Trader Vic's" I have those shakers and a bowl!

Trader Vic's or the beautiful Calabasas Inn or the HungryTiger would be my logical choices, but truthfully I have to vote for a relatively unknown restaurant --although 4-star rated for most of its existence. "Michael's Canoga Inn" in the San Fernando Valley, because my family owned it and half my life was involved there in some way.

Loves ♥️ had yummy meaty bbq beans.

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This is the original Garden Of Allah model from the Spanish Hollywood oasis that used to reside at the corner of Sunset Strip and Crescent Heights. Yes, this is really it. The model used to sit at Lytton Savings bank after the hotel was demolished in the 60s. It's now sitting on the coffee table of someone who has preserved and taken very good care of it all these years! ...

This is the original Garden Of Allah model from the Spanish Hollywood oasis that used to reside at the corner of Sunset Strip and Crescent Heights. Yes, this is really it. The model used to sit at Lytton Savings bank after the hotel was demolished in the 60s. Its now sitting on the coffee table of someone who has preserved and taken very good care of it all these years!

 

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It used to sit in this glass box under a canopy on the south west corner

I was researching it last night. can’t believe it’s a parking lot/plaza nowadays 😫

I heard this was actually stolen from Lytton -- true or false?

which corner - N, S, E or W??

Rather ironic that the model of a structure that was torn down and sat in another structure that faced demolishment .Remember seeing the model in the old Lytton savings and loan .Mr Lytton died in '69 and his bank was absorbed by Chase .Often , when businesses change hands , 'things' go missing ...theft.Hopefully the model will end up in a public museum for all to enjoy .

Very cool. That was really fun intersection over the years. Pandora's Box night club, Harry's Open Pit BBQ And other great places.

That would look just perfect under my Christmas Tree!

Crazy people like us maintain history. Preserve and protect. That's why your work is important.

Way larger complex than i thought.

I've visited that model a while ago and later I blogged about it. Actually, it's one of my most-visited blog posts: bit.ly/goamodel

I have the book written by sheila graham written in 1969 she was lovers with f.scott ... i googled that only one perso age 97 a woman from that era was still alive a couple years ago. a woman who was a mexican actress model who hung out at the garden of allah for years until she married a wealthy man in mexico city

I went to see it when it was still there. I think the bank was storing it in an empty space in the mini mall, and a salon owner, rented it, and asked about the model and I think they gave it too him. That is the story I recall hearing.

Huw Williams can you show this to Ron when you see him. He wanted to go there years ago but it had been demolished. Happy Christmas

SO SO GREAT ! My father celebrated his 21st birthday there in... um... 1941. What a fabulous thing to preserve.

Is the South West corner where the Garden of Allah was originally located? We "lived" up there (Pandora's Box, Schwabs, Steak and Stein, Club Frascati, I believe, or The Liars Club became The Coconut Teaser...since 1964, but I can't recall ever seeing The Garden of Allah.....It must have been gone by then?

Yes, demolishing paradise. It looked like a spanish village. Beam me back! Sigh..... martinturnbull.com/about-the-garden-of-allah-series-of-books-by-martin-turnbull/about-the-garden-...

So much of Hollywoods history has either been destroyed or is private collections never to be seen again. Many times people don't realize what they have and don't care for it. I remember a story about some Star Trek props. Some went to collectors auctions and a few wound up in the cast and/or crews hands. I remember reading about one family letting their kids play with the phaser props and you could see they were just beat to hell, totally worthless. A model of the Enterprise wound up in someone's home and it was stuck by a heating vent and over the years the heat deformed the miniature. Of course when she got desperate for cash and wanted to sell it was the only time she took an interest in it. Seems like there are three groups these artifacts wind up with; 1. speculators who don't care or know about the artifact and are only interested in how to drive the price up and then resell it for a profit, 2. Non-fans who get the stuff and toss it in a closet or place it on a shelf to let it fall apart and only take an interest in it when they need cash (many times it is not worth restoring) or it gets passed to a relative, 3. The superfan who locks it away and it is never seen again by the public. The only time it reappears is at Cristy's when they die. It would be nice if this stuff wound up in museums but that costs money to acquire the stuff and to maintain it. The studios are not interested in preserving this stuff... hell, they don't even care for the film in their libraries and it falls to film schools, the AFI, or private individuals to restore the film. So many movies and shows have been lost over the years, so props and wardrobe take a backseat in this regard.

The problem is that we see history and developers see the opportunity to make money and that whatever is on the land is usually in the way of them making the money. The developers get the local government on their side by telling them about all the extra tax dollars that the city will have at their disposal and what good they can do with that money. The only "good" that developers are concerned with is what is good for their bank account. It is amazing how few old buildings that have survived the developer's wrecking ball here in the west. The east coast and Europe have some really old structures that tell us about the past. Here it is considered old, a waste of space and/or opportunity. So much of my past is gone and I am really not that old (58).

I remember seeing it in there. Really amazing model.

Stunning. We could more beauty like this in this city again with open spaces

I used to see this model inside the bank under glass 1991

As Joni Mitchell wrote, they paved paradise and put up a parking lot.

Someone should rebuild using the model as a diagram

Current home of a McDonald's (sigh)

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