Welcome to Vintage Los Angeles

Alison Martino is a Los Angeles-based television producer, documentarian, columnist for Los Angeles Magazine and lifelong resident of the city. Alison’s current social media reach is over 800,000 and growing. Her zeal for history and lifelong penchant for collecting has resulted in one of the largest collections of restaurant memorabilia, photographs, postcards, and matchbooks. Her deep knowledge of Hollywood history and personal acquaintances throughout the industry has resulted in features about Alison on ABC’s Eye on L.A., The Travel Channel, NPR Radio, The Huffington Post, CurbedLA, The New York Times, and the nationally syndicated show, The Insider. In December of 2015, she also landed on the cover of West Hollywood Magazine. 2017 was a banner year for Alison as she co-produced and stared in a film about the life of Jayne Mansfield (called “Mansfield ’66/’67”) which was featured in 17 film festivals worldwide. Alison also had the honor of hosting an event at the Aero Theatre where she interviewed Rose Marie, Dick Van Dyke, Peter Marshall and Carl Reiner. On top of all that, she was also featured in a commercial for Turner Classic Movies. 2018 is continuing right where 2017 left off with Alison busy as ever.

Check out Alison’s latest Blog entries here.

For Alison’s recent article in Curbed LA on Quentin Tarantino’s transformation of Hollywood Boulevard for his latest movie “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”, click here.

Martino’s affection for old Hollywood and her hometown’s architecture led her to create the wildly popular Vintage Los Angeles (VLA)— an ever growing photo-centric Facebook page dedicated to highlighting L.A.’s physical transformation during the 20th Century, as well as its history as the center of the entertainment industry and community. Vintage Los Angeles not only focuses on sharing photos, but also on creating an active online community. Vintage Los Angeles has over 325,000 followers on Facebook, and has become a go-to site for commentary and conversation on the entertainment industry and Hollywood history.

Before starting VLA, Alison Martino produced television shows for Bravo, TV Land, A&E, VH1, Lifetime and Ryan Seacrest Productions. She spent five years at E! Entertainment Television producing the classic cult series Mysteries & Scandals, a Hollywood Babylon-esque show which focused on the flip side of fame. For her TV productions and live events, Alison has interviewed dozens of movie star legends and pop culture icons including Dennis Hopper, Jack Lemmon, Cliff Robertson, Steve Allen, Phyllis Diller, Dick Cavett, Betty White, Janet Leigh, Glen Campbell, Nancy Sinatra, Valerie Harper, The Smothers Brothers, Casey Kasem, Roger Corman, Bryan Cranston and the cast of “Dukes of Hazzard.”

The entertainment industry is taking note of the enormous audience Alison has built for VLA and her other social media outlets. To gain access to what Alison has built, Lionsgate engaged her to promote La La Land on the Vintage Los Angeles page, including red-carpet interviews at the film’s premiere. For the 2013 film Gangster Squad, Alison provided Warner Bros. her own vintage Los Angeles memorabilia. She generated a ton of buzz for the Tower Records documentary, All Things Must Pass, directed by Colin Hanks. In 2017, Martino was invited to attend the TCM CLASSIC FILM FESTIVAL. Her coverage was so extensive it led her to partner with the network for future programs, events and movie releases. Alison’s extensive collection of personal memorabilia even caught the eye of Oliver Stone back in 1991 for his movie The Doors, where she supplied many of her rare relics and artifacts for the production.


 

‘West Hollywood’ magazine feature

Alison Martino's Vintage Los Angeles Alison Martino
Alison teamed up with the Ebersole Hughes Company to create the web series VLA TV. She is also media director for Dan Tana’s, a West Hollywood Italian eatery popular with celebrities and locals since 1964. Her passion for this historic restaurant landed her a full-time position promoting its 52 years in business.

Martino is an advocate for historic preservation of the architecture that makes Los Angeles and its surrounding communities like West Hollywood, Beverly Hills and Santa Monica unique, and for the buildings that are iconic representations of the entertainment industry. She worked to bring back the original Chasen’s Chili, helped save vintage signs on Sunset Strip and to preserve the original caricatures on the walls of The Palm Restaurant, and advocated removal of vendor carts that blocked public access to the historic Chinese Theater in Hollywood — a crusade that was spotlighted in the New York Times and Hollywood Reporter.


Welcome to Vintage Los Angeles

Alison Martino Alison Martino is a Los Angeles-based television producer, documentarian, columnist for Los Angeles Magazine and lifelong resident of the city. Alison’s current social media reach is over 800,000 and growing. Her zeal for history and lifelong penchant for collecting has resulted in one of the largest collections of restaurant memorabilia, photographs, postcards, and matchbooks. Her deep knowledge of Hollywood history and personal acquaintances throughout the industry has resulted in features about Alison on ABC’s Eye on L.A., The Travel Channel, NPR Radio, The Huffington Post, CurbedLA, The New York Times, and the nationally syndicated show, The Insider. In December of 2015, she also landed on the cover of West Hollywood Magazine. 2017 was a busy year for Alison as she co-produced and stared in a film about the life of Jayne Mansfield (called “Mansfield ’66/’67”) which was featured in 17 film festivals worldwide. Alison also had the honor of hosting an event at the Aero Theatre where she interviewed Rose Marie, Dick Van Dyke, Peter Marshall and Carl Reiner. On top of all that, she was also featured in a commercial for Turner Classic Movies. 2018 is continuing right where 2017 left off with Alison busy as ever.

Check out Alison’s latest Blog entries here.

For Alison’s recent article in Curbed LA on Quentin Tarantino’s transformation of Hollywood Boulevard for his latest movie “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”, click here.

Martino’s affection for old Hollywood and her hometown’s architecture led her to create the wildly popular Vintage Los Angeles (VLA)— an ever growing photo-centric Facebook page dedicated to highlighting L.A.’s physical transformation during the 20th Century, as well as its history as the center of the entertainment industry and community. Vintage Los Angeles not only focuses on sharing photos, but also on creating an active online community. Vintage Los Angeles has over 325,000 followers on Facebook, and has become a go-to site for commentary and conversation on the entertainment industry and Hollywood history.

Before starting VLA, Alison Martino produced television shows for Bravo, TV Land, A&E, VH1, Lifetime and Ryan Seacrest Productions. She spent five years at E! Entertainment Television producing the classic cult series Mysteries & Scandals, a Hollywood Babylon-esque show which focused on the flip side of fame. For her TV productions and live events, Alison has interviewed dozens of movie star legends and pop culture icons including Dennis Hopper, Jack Lemmon, Cliff Robertson, Steve Allen, Phyllis Diller, Dick Cavett, Betty White, Janet Leigh, Glen Campbell, Nancy Sinatra, Valerie Harper, The Smothers Brothers, Casey Kasem, Roger Corman, Bryan Cranston and the cast of “Dukes of Hazzard.”

The entertainment industry is taking note of the enormous audience Alison has built for VLA and her other social media outlets. To gain access to what Alison has built, Lionsgate engaged her to promote La La Land on the Vintage Los Angeles page, including red-carpet interviews at the film’s premiere. For the 2013 film Gangster Squad, Alison provided Warner Bros. her own vintage Los Angeles memorabilia. She generated a ton of buzz for the Tower Records documentary, All Things Must Pass, directed by Colin Hanks. In 2017, Martino was invited to attend the TCM CLASSIC FILM FESTIVAL. Her coverage was so extensive it led her to partner with the network for future programs, events and movie releases. Alison’s extensive collection of personal memorabilia even caught the eye of Oliver Stone back in 1991 for his movie The Doors, where she supplied many of her rare relics and artifacts for the production.

Alison Martino

Alison teamed up with the Ebersole Hughes Company to create the web series VLA TV. She is also media director for Dan Tana’s, a West Hollywood Italian eatery popular with celebrities and locals since 1964. Her passion for this historic restaurant landed her a full-time position promoting its 52 years in business.

Martino is an advocate for historic preservation of the architecture that makes Los Angeles and its surrounding communities like West Hollywood, Beverly Hills and Santa Monica unique, and for the buildings that are iconic representations of the entertainment industry. She worked to bring back the original Chasen’s Chili, helped save vintage signs on Sunset Strip and to preserve the original caricatures on the walls of The Palm Restaurant, and advocated removal of vendor carts that blocked public access to the historic Chinese Theater in Hollywood — a crusade that was spotlighted in the New York Times and Hollywood Reporter.

‘West Hollywood’ magazine feature

Alison Martino's Vintage Los Angeles 
Vintage Los Angeles is a labor of love,” Alison said. “It is a daily celebration and a historical resource that draws people from all over the world. It’s the next best thing to a time machine.”

What's Happening with Vintage Los Angeles

What’s Happening with Vintage Los Angeles?

21 hours ago

Vintage Los Angeles

Chez Jay is full of vintage relics like this historic faux sea shell clam that was saved from PACIFIC OCEAN PARK. It used to be located the Neptune’s courtyard during the 1960s, now it’s on the side wall at Chez Jay facing the parking lot. 🐚 ... See MoreSee Less

Chez Jay is full of vintage relics like this historic faux sea shell clam that was saved from PACIFIC OCEAN PARK. It used to be located the Neptune’s courtyard during the 1960s, now it’s on the side wall at Chez Jay facing the parking lot.  🐚Image attachmentImage attachment

 

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Mark Goddard and Penny Fuller in front of the shells...

nice detective work, Baby.

POP! The roller coaster !

We loved POP!

So cool! My husband and I remember going to POP as we called it, when we were kids. (He’s a bit obsessed with it lol!)

I remember that seashell. POP was one of my most favorite places to go when I was in junior high and high school.

Thank you, VLA! You know how I love any and all POP posts! ❤️

All these years in Santa Monica and I never knew that! So cool.

Do you have a picture of the waterfall fountain that was on hill street in downtown Los Angeles??. I remember in the late 50s and 60s the fountain used to run all the time.

I knew that was from there the first time I saw it just from looking at old pics of Pacific Ocean Park!

Here is the photo I forget to post.

Here is a photo and short caption for POP,from Los Angeles Times Mid Winter magazine, January 1959.

I want to start a trendy gym I'll name, "Chez Pup".

P O P! Was there some sort of spinning ride there where you stood up against the side walls and the floor dropped out from under you? Or was that just a terrifying nightmare from my youth?

Loved pop-celebrated my 12th Birthday there!

are there still peanut shells on the floor??

The first time I ever had steamed clams was here some time in the 70’s.

Had the immense pleasure of the "POP" only once...sigh! But what a ball it was! Wish some of your followers would post more pics of the "POP". The place rocked, big time!

Tres cool!

I keep meaning to stop there when I’m in LA

Took my sister-in-law and her wacky friends from Boston there for dinner earlier this week. Butter steaks all around.

I remember the "aquarium" near the entrance at POP, with the fish on wires "swimming" around with bubbles so it appeared they were actually underwater. I think it was inside the building that the shells were mounted on.

The food is really delicious!

I need to go here! Next time I’m in CA

Used to go to POP all the time.

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There will be oil...We explore the Hidden Oil Fields of LA. Yes, LA sits on the 3rd largest oil field in the USA. Most of this dirty industry is hidden behind shopping malls, fa... ... See MoreSee Less

Video image

 

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Downtown Huntington Beach.

I remember so many oil wells pumping away all over the place. We used to drive from Huntington Park to Newport Beach before the freeways and I there were so many oil wells rhythmically pumping away all along the coast. Very soothing rhythm for a little kid in the back seat.

Why on earth would they use the deliverance song?

We moved to mid-Wilshire in 2003, and were surprised to learn that we get a residual check every 3 months for oil being pumped from underneath our little plot of land. It ends up at the 'fake building' at Pico and Genesee.

the video mentions the Beverly Hills High oil well, but doesn't mention the oil from that well supports the school. I once worked in a building (Wilshire and Rampart) that had to have an oil sump pump in the bottom of elevator shaft to prevent the elevators from catching fire.

I was shocked on my first visit. Oil wells were not what I expected in LA

I have worked at the rig on Pico many times. You can drive by it and never know what is in that building. It goes a few stories underground (kind of a hassle to get your work truck out of the ramps are slick). And I would enjoy taking the long way there and drive my big, dirty service truck through some neighborhoods where you normally would not see something like that. Haha

so, so many when i was a kid in Los. born in 55....all over culver city, etc.....

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1 day ago

Vintage Los Angeles

This is hard to fathom! La Cienega and 3rd in 1939.

Photo Ansel Adams
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This is hard to fathom! La Cienega and 3rd in 1939. 

Photo Ansel Adams

 

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Today

The oil well is still there today...just kinda hidden within the Beverly Center.

Many people don’t know that LA was built as an oil town and that the entire LA basin was one of the largest oil fields in the country. J. Paul Getty built that city and became a very rich man in the process

Even harder to fathom is that Ansel Adams shot this.

I remember the derricks in Huntington Beach, Signal Hill covered in derricks, and horses (pumps) all over the city.

Ansel Adams...one of the best of black and white photography....

Yep, and orange and lemon groves, grape vineyards and clean air.

I remember all of the oil wells on La Cienega between Rodeo Rd and Slauson. Wonder if they are still in existence.

I remember the oil derrick in middle of La Cienega in ‘40’s and ‘50’s. We lived nearby.

Nice photo. Kid has some talent.

There is still an oil well behind the Beverly Center, San Vicente side opposite Cedars Sinai.

Angelenos knew where their gasoline-fueled automotive culture came from in those days.

Brings back memories of oil wells near Baldwin Hills. I had forgotten about them. Thank you so much for this site.

What? 😂😭 and wow. Wish I had a commute up it like this everyday lol

Signal hill ..I have some old pics will look for you

Yeah...I'll bet nobody ever crashed into that one.

I grew up there when oil rigs were everywhere. In the day the beaches weren’t very beautiful and lots of tar balls.

My Dad's Machine Shop was at 3rd and Alameda at that same time. Not today!

I remember that. Passed them on the way to the airport.

what is the concept of drilling an oil well in the middle of a street?

Back when you could drill for oil anywhere!

Many rigs still exist, they're just camouflaged by a facade.

We still have them in Huntington Beach. They’re pumping a block away right now where a house was demolished.

I remember the oil well on LaCienega.

It is! I passed this intersection every day in the 80s on my way to high school on Rossmore and 3rd. Wow! Times change.

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