Welcome to Vintage Los Angeles

Alison Martino is a Los Angeles-based television producer, columnist for Los Angeles Magazine and lifelong resident of the city. Alison’s current social media reach is over 800,000 and growing. Her zeal for history and lifelong penchant for collecting has resulted in one of the largest collections of restaurant memorabilia, photographs, postcards, and matchbooks. Her deep knowledge of Hollywood history and personal acquaintances throughout the industry has resulted in features about Alison on ABC’s Eye on L.A., The Travel Channel, NPR Radio, The Huffington Post, CurbedLA, The New York Times, and the nationally syndicated show, The Insider. In December of 2015, she also landed on the cover of West Hollywood Magazine. 2017 has been a busy year for Alison as she co-produced and stared in a film about the life of Jayne Mansfield (called “Mansfield ’66/’67”) which was featured in 17 film festivals worldwide. Click here to watch the Mansfield ’66/’67 trailer. Alison also recently had the honor of hosting an event at the Aero Theatre where she interviewed Rose Marie, Dick Van Dyke, Peter Marshall and Carl Reiner. On top of all that, she was also recently featured in a commercial for Turner Classic Movies.

Check out Alison’s latest Blog entries here.

Martino’s affection for old Hollywood and her hometown’s architecture led her to create the wildly popular Vintage Los Angeles (VLA)— an ever growing photo-centric Facebook page dedicated to highlighting L.A.’s physical transformation during the 20th Century, as well as its history as the center of the entertainment industry and community. Vintage Los Angeles not only focuses on sharing photos, but also on creating an active online community. Vintage Los Angeles has 278,000 followers on Facebook, and has become a go-to site for commentary and conversation on the entertainment industry and Hollywood history.

Before starting VLA, Alison Martino produced television shows for Bravo, TV Land, A&E, VH1, Lifetime and Ryan Seacrest Productions. She spent five years at E! Entertainment Television producing the classic cult series Mysteries & Scandals, a Hollywood Babylon-esque show which focused on the flip side of fame. For her TV productions and live events, Alison has interviewed dozens of movie star legends and pop culture icons including Dennis Hopper, Jack Lemmon, Cliff Robertson, Steve Allen, Phyllis Diller, Dick Cavett, Betty White, Janet Leigh, Glen Campbell, Nancy Sinatra, Valerie Harper, The Smothers Brothers, Casey Kasem, Roger Corman, Bryan Cranston and the cast of “Dukes of Hazzard.”

The entertainment industry is taking note of the enormous audience Alison has built for VLA and her other social media outlets. To gain access to what Alison has built, Lionsgate engaged her to promote La La Land on the Vintage Los Angeles page, including red-carpet interviews at the film’s premiere. For the 2013 film Gangster Squad, Alison provided Warner Bros. her own vintage Los Angeles memorabilia. She generated a ton of buzz for the Tower Records documentary, All Things Must Pass, directed by Colin Hanks. In 2017, Martino was invited to attend the TCM CLASSIC FILM FESTIVAL. Her coverage was so extensive it led her to partner with the network for future programs, events and movie releases.


 

‘West Hollywood’ magazine feature

Alison Martino's Vintage Los Angeles Alison Martino
Alison recently teamed up with the Ebersole Hughes Company to create the web series VLA TV. She is also media director for Dan Tana’s, a West Hollywood Italian eatery popular with celebrities and locals since 1964. Her passion for this historic restaurant landed her a full-time position promoting its 52 years in business.

Martino is an advocate for historic preservation of the architecture that makes Los Angeles and its surrounding communities like West Hollywood, Beverly Hills and Santa Monica unique, and for the buildings that are iconic representations of the entertainment industry. She worked to bring back the original Chasen’s Chili, helped save vintage signs on Sunset Strip and to preserve the original caricatures on the walls of The Palm Restaurant, and advocated removal of vendor carts that blocked public access to the historic Chinese Theater in Hollywood — a crusade that was spotlighted in the New York Times and Hollywood Reporter.


Welcome to Vintage Los Angeles

Alison Martino Alison Martino is a Los Angeles-based television producer, columnist for Los Angeles Magazine and lifelong resident of the city. Alison’s current social media reach is over 800,000 and growing. Her zeal for history and lifelong penchant for collecting has resulted in one of the largest collections of restaurant memorabilia, photographs, postcards, and matchbooks. Her deep knowledge of Hollywood history and personal acquaintances throughout the industry has resulted in features about Alison on ABC’s Eye on L.A., The Travel Channel, NPR Radio, The Huffington Post, CurbedLA, The New York Times, and the nationally syndicated show, The Insider. In December of 2015, she also landed on the cover of West Hollywood Magazine. 2017 has been a busy year for Alison as she co-produced and stared in a film about the life of Jayne Mansfield (called “Mansfield ’66/’67”) which was featured in 17 film festivals worldwide. Click here to watch the Mansfield ’66/’67 trailer. Alison also recently had the honor of hosting an event at the Aero Theatre where she interviewed Rose Marie, Dick Van Dyke, Peter Marshall and Carl Reiner. On top of all that, she was also recently featured in a commercial for Turner Classic Movies.

Check out Alison’s latest Blog entries here.

Martino’s affection for old Hollywood and her hometown’s architecture led her to create the wildly popular Vintage Los Angeles (VLA)— an ever growing photo-centric Facebook page dedicated to highlighting L.A.’s physical transformation during the 20th Century, as well as its history as the center of the entertainment industry and community. Vintage Los Angeles not only focuses on sharing photos, but also on creating an active online community. Vintage Los Angeles has 278,000 followers on Facebook, and has become a go-to site for commentary and conversation on the entertainment industry and Hollywood history.

Before starting VLA, Alison Martino produced television shows for Bravo, TV Land, A&E, VH1, Lifetime and Ryan Seacrest Productions. She spent five years at E! Entertainment Television producing the classic cult series Mysteries & Scandals, a Hollywood Babylon-esque show which focused on the flip side of fame. For her TV productions and live events, Alison has interviewed dozens of movie star legends and pop culture icons including Dennis Hopper, Jack Lemmon, Cliff Robertson, Steve Allen, Phyllis Diller, Dick Cavett, Betty White, Janet Leigh, Glen Campbell, Nancy Sinatra, Valerie Harper, The Smothers Brothers, Casey Kasem, Roger Corman, Bryan Cranston and the cast of “Dukes of Hazzard.”

The entertainment industry is taking note of the enormous audience Alison has built for VLA and her other social media outlets. To gain access to what Alison has built, Lionsgate engaged her to promote La La Land on the Vintage Los Angeles page, including red-carpet interviews at the film’s premiere. For the 2013 film Gangster Squad, Alison provided Warner Bros. her own vintage Los Angeles memorabilia. She generated a ton of buzz for the Tower Records documentary, All Things Must Pass, directed by Colin Hanks. In 2017, Martino was invited to attend the TCM CLASSIC FILM FESTIVAL. Her coverage was so extensive it led her to partner with the network for future programs, events and movie releases.

Alison Martino

Alison recently teamed up with the Ebersole Hughes Company to create the web series VLA TV. She is also media director for Dan Tana’s, a West Hollywood Italian eatery popular with celebrities and locals since 1964. Her passion for this historic restaurant landed her a full-time position promoting its 52 years in business.

Martino is an advocate for historic preservation of the architecture that makes Los Angeles and its surrounding communities like West Hollywood, Beverly Hills and Santa Monica unique, and for the buildings that are iconic representations of the entertainment industry. She worked to bring back the original Chasen’s Chili, helped save vintage signs on Sunset Strip and to preserve the original caricatures on the walls of The Palm Restaurant, and advocated removal of vendor carts that blocked public access to the historic Chinese Theater in Hollywood — a crusade that was spotlighted in the New York Times and Hollywood Reporter.

‘West Hollywood’ magazine feature

Alison Martino's Vintage Los Angeles 
Vintage Los Angeles is a labor of love,” Alison said. “It is a daily celebration and a historical resource that draws people from all over the world. It’s the next best thing to a time machine.”

What's Happening with Vintage Los Angeles

What’s Happening with Vintage Los Angeles?

7 hours ago

Vintage Los Angeles

No, this is not a scene from “Grease” or “Them”. This is a real photograph of L.A. River drag racing in the 1950’s! This is directly underneath the 6th St Bridge that joins Boyle Heights to Downtown LA.

Wonder if there was a rumble later that night...
...

No, this is not a scene from “Grease” or “Them”. This is a real photograph of L.A. River drag racing in the 1950’s! This is directly underneath the 6th St Bridge that joins Boyle Heights to Downtown LA.

Wonder if there was a rumble later that night...

 

Comment on Facebook

"Rebel Without A Cause" stuff. Right? And then they went to the Griffeth Observatory? The fifties racing flat head fords. YES!

THEM!!!!! One of my favorites

Its gone now? What about the drain? Is it all gone?

1960’s-70 too

That is such an awesome photo!

Used to ride horseback from Los Feliz blvd horse rentals near uncle Johns pancake house through those big holes under golden state freeway across to Griffith park .

Been there. So illegal, so dangerous, so much fun.

I don't see Cha Cha DeGregorio...

Where are the Rodriguez brothers?

I would have liked to live in that golden days of Hollywood to experience this first hand 🙂

Drag racing was HUGE in So. Cal in the 50’s! They had SOO many tracks, all but 3-4 are all gone now

Racin’ for pink slips.

I miss that bridge

wonder if they broke into song?

It appears the drought has been going on for a lot longer......

My dad could of been there, at that time 🙂

Been there and done that in late 50.s

Good bye to Sandra Dee!

6th st viaduct is gone now. Who got a piece?

Danny: Sandy! Sandy: Tell me about it, stud.

W0W! And, I betcha VLA, there was one afterwards... good call.

I would of love to see this😎

Thank you!!!!

Very cool 😎

Thanks Alison. Great shot.

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7 hours ago

Vintage Los Angeles

Devo performing at the Beverly Theater in Beverly Hills. This concert kicked off their first show in 1982.The first song of the first show of the tour of 1982. ...

Video image

 

Comment on Facebook

Once upon a time when I was a little person and Devo was huge, I noticed Mark Mothersbaugh sitting in the booth opposite us in Aki, a Japanese restaurant in WLA. He noticed the kid noticing him and fixed me with a bug-eyed stare. Busted, I looked away, then looked back - he was still staring! Looked away, looked back - still the eyeballs! Looked away again, then back. His spot in the booth was now empty...then a hand rises from under the table holding a chopstick with a napkin tied to it, waving the white flag!

My best friend and I saw them on NYE at The Long Beach Arena with X ... It was around this time...

Saw them at the Tower in Upper Darby, PA, they RAWKED!

I grew up thinking Devo was just a shitty gimmick band from Whip and Satisfaction (both songs are to me bad) then as an adult I got into Jocko Homo and their deep cuts and realized they are a BADASS band!!!!! Like The Clash, one of my favorite bands of all time, what is their most popular song? Their worst song Rock the Casbah (to me anyway) everything else is GOLD!!!!

Devo Spudwazz

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10 hours ago

Vintage Los Angeles

Biltmore Hotel room during the 1970s ...

Biltmore Hotel room during the 1970s

 

Comment on Facebook

Just add cigarette smoke smell for that authentic feel. 😏

Ya.. But no wifi...

We had a suite at the Biltmore on our wedding night almost 30 years ago. We had a living room, dining room, bedroom, and two bathrooms with telephones mounted on the walls next to the toilets. We only used the bedroom and one bathroom. The rooms were much nicer than depicted in this photograph.

My aunt stayed there in the eighties. The Presidential Suite had the Seal of POTUS on the front door.

Looks too cold, too much like a waiting room for my taste, but I imagine they were trying to move away from the hotel's vintage roots at the time to compete with newer properties like the Bonaventure.

and no remote for the TV. I don't think those became standard until the very late 70's/early 80's.

what a horrible design ..or was there even design? The 1970s did have some nice points of design this wasn't it.

Those chairs do not look comfortable at all. Too wide to use the armrests, and the seat cushions look thin.

What is Wi-Fi?

Hmmm...I would have thought the Biltmore only used classical period furniture.

Thank God for the modern era 😱

Eek! That does not look like a high-end hotel room. 😖

That's pretty nice-lookin' for the '70's!👍

Howard Bannister and / or Eunice Burns may have stayed there - if they came south.

If they did just one room like that now I would book that room right now.

love the blue

Was just there yesterday!

Still love that blue.

Love the look

Looks just like the era.

Simple but comfy

Love it. I want that lovely blue couch

amazing

Hi-Fi

Crisp look.

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