Welcome to Vintage Los Angeles

Alison Martino is a Los Angeles-based television producer, documentarian, columnist for Los Angeles Magazine and lifelong resident of the city. Alison’s current social media reach is over 800,000 and growing. Her zeal for history and lifelong penchant for collecting has resulted in one of the largest collections of restaurant memorabilia, photographs, postcards, and matchbooks. Her deep knowledge of Hollywood history and personal acquaintances throughout the industry has resulted in features about Alison on ABC’s Eye on L.A., The Travel Channel, NPR Radio, The Huffington Post, CurbedLA, The New York Times, and the nationally syndicated show, The Insider. In December of 2015, she also landed on the cover of West Hollywood Magazine. 2017 was a banner year for Alison as she co-produced and stared in a film about the life of Jayne Mansfield (called “Mansfield ’66/’67”) which was featured in 17 film festivals worldwide. Alison also had the honor of hosting an event at the Aero Theatre where she interviewed Rose Marie, Dick Van Dyke, Peter Marshall and Carl Reiner. On top of all that, she was also featured in a commercial for Turner Classic Movies. 2018 is continuing right where 2017 left off with Alison busy as ever.

Check out Alison’s latest Blog entries here.

For Alison’s recent article in Curbed LA on Quentin Tarantino’s transformation of Hollywood Boulevard for his latest movie “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”, click here.

Martino’s affection for old Hollywood and her hometown’s architecture led her to create the wildly popular Vintage Los Angeles (VLA)— an ever growing photo-centric Facebook page dedicated to highlighting L.A.’s physical transformation during the 20th Century, as well as its history as the center of the entertainment industry and community. Vintage Los Angeles not only focuses on sharing photos, but also on creating an active online community. Vintage Los Angeles has over 325,000 followers on Facebook, and has become a go-to site for commentary and conversation on the entertainment industry and Hollywood history.

Before starting VLA, Alison Martino produced television shows for Bravo, TV Land, A&E, VH1, Lifetime and Ryan Seacrest Productions. She spent five years at E! Entertainment Television producing the classic cult series Mysteries & Scandals, a Hollywood Babylon-esque show which focused on the flip side of fame. For her TV productions and live events, Alison has interviewed dozens of movie star legends and pop culture icons including Dennis Hopper, Jack Lemmon, Cliff Robertson, Steve Allen, Phyllis Diller, Dick Cavett, Betty White, Janet Leigh, Glen Campbell, Nancy Sinatra, Valerie Harper, The Smothers Brothers, Casey Kasem, Roger Corman, Bryan Cranston and the cast of “Dukes of Hazzard.”

The entertainment industry is taking note of the enormous audience Alison has built for VLA and her other social media outlets. To gain access to what Alison has built, Lionsgate engaged her to promote La La Land on the Vintage Los Angeles page, including red-carpet interviews at the film’s premiere. For the 2013 film Gangster Squad, Alison provided Warner Bros. her own vintage Los Angeles memorabilia. She generated a ton of buzz for the Tower Records documentary, All Things Must Pass, directed by Colin Hanks. In 2017, Martino was invited to attend the TCM CLASSIC FILM FESTIVAL. Her coverage was so extensive it led her to partner with the network for future programs, events and movie releases. Alison’s extensive collection of personal memorabilia even caught the eye of Oliver Stone back in 1991 for his movie The Doors, where she supplied many of her rare relics and artifacts for the production.


 

‘West Hollywood’ magazine feature

Alison Martino's Vintage Los Angeles Alison Martino
Alison teamed up with the Ebersole Hughes Company to create the web series VLA TV. She is also media director for Dan Tana’s, a West Hollywood Italian eatery popular with celebrities and locals since 1964. Her passion for this historic restaurant landed her a full-time position promoting its 52 years in business.

Martino is an advocate for historic preservation of the architecture that makes Los Angeles and its surrounding communities like West Hollywood, Beverly Hills and Santa Monica unique, and for the buildings that are iconic representations of the entertainment industry. She worked to bring back the original Chasen’s Chili, helped save vintage signs on Sunset Strip and to preserve the original caricatures on the walls of The Palm Restaurant, and advocated removal of vendor carts that blocked public access to the historic Chinese Theater in Hollywood — a crusade that was spotlighted in the New York Times and Hollywood Reporter.


Welcome to Vintage Los Angeles

Alison Martino Alison Martino is a Los Angeles-based television producer, documentarian, columnist for Los Angeles Magazine and lifelong resident of the city. Alison’s current social media reach is over 800,000 and growing. Her zeal for history and lifelong penchant for collecting has resulted in one of the largest collections of restaurant memorabilia, photographs, postcards, and matchbooks. Her deep knowledge of Hollywood history and personal acquaintances throughout the industry has resulted in features about Alison on ABC’s Eye on L.A., The Travel Channel, NPR Radio, The Huffington Post, CurbedLA, The New York Times, and the nationally syndicated show, The Insider. In December of 2015, she also landed on the cover of West Hollywood Magazine. 2017 was a busy year for Alison as she co-produced and stared in a film about the life of Jayne Mansfield (called “Mansfield ’66/’67”) which was featured in 17 film festivals worldwide. Alison also had the honor of hosting an event at the Aero Theatre where she interviewed Rose Marie, Dick Van Dyke, Peter Marshall and Carl Reiner. On top of all that, she was also featured in a commercial for Turner Classic Movies. 2018 is continuing right where 2017 left off with Alison busy as ever.

Check out Alison’s latest Blog entries here.

For Alison’s recent article in Curbed LA on Quentin Tarantino’s transformation of Hollywood Boulevard for his latest movie “Once Upon a Time in Hollywood”, click here.

Martino’s affection for old Hollywood and her hometown’s architecture led her to create the wildly popular Vintage Los Angeles (VLA)— an ever growing photo-centric Facebook page dedicated to highlighting L.A.’s physical transformation during the 20th Century, as well as its history as the center of the entertainment industry and community. Vintage Los Angeles not only focuses on sharing photos, but also on creating an active online community. Vintage Los Angeles has over 325,000 followers on Facebook, and has become a go-to site for commentary and conversation on the entertainment industry and Hollywood history.

Before starting VLA, Alison Martino produced television shows for Bravo, TV Land, A&E, VH1, Lifetime and Ryan Seacrest Productions. She spent five years at E! Entertainment Television producing the classic cult series Mysteries & Scandals, a Hollywood Babylon-esque show which focused on the flip side of fame. For her TV productions and live events, Alison has interviewed dozens of movie star legends and pop culture icons including Dennis Hopper, Jack Lemmon, Cliff Robertson, Steve Allen, Phyllis Diller, Dick Cavett, Betty White, Janet Leigh, Glen Campbell, Nancy Sinatra, Valerie Harper, The Smothers Brothers, Casey Kasem, Roger Corman, Bryan Cranston and the cast of “Dukes of Hazzard.”

The entertainment industry is taking note of the enormous audience Alison has built for VLA and her other social media outlets. To gain access to what Alison has built, Lionsgate engaged her to promote La La Land on the Vintage Los Angeles page, including red-carpet interviews at the film’s premiere. For the 2013 film Gangster Squad, Alison provided Warner Bros. her own vintage Los Angeles memorabilia. She generated a ton of buzz for the Tower Records documentary, All Things Must Pass, directed by Colin Hanks. In 2017, Martino was invited to attend the TCM CLASSIC FILM FESTIVAL. Her coverage was so extensive it led her to partner with the network for future programs, events and movie releases. Alison’s extensive collection of personal memorabilia even caught the eye of Oliver Stone back in 1991 for his movie The Doors, where she supplied many of her rare relics and artifacts for the production.

Alison Martino

Alison teamed up with the Ebersole Hughes Company to create the web series VLA TV. She is also media director for Dan Tana’s, a West Hollywood Italian eatery popular with celebrities and locals since 1964. Her passion for this historic restaurant landed her a full-time position promoting its 52 years in business.

Martino is an advocate for historic preservation of the architecture that makes Los Angeles and its surrounding communities like West Hollywood, Beverly Hills and Santa Monica unique, and for the buildings that are iconic representations of the entertainment industry. She worked to bring back the original Chasen’s Chili, helped save vintage signs on Sunset Strip and to preserve the original caricatures on the walls of The Palm Restaurant, and advocated removal of vendor carts that blocked public access to the historic Chinese Theater in Hollywood — a crusade that was spotlighted in the New York Times and Hollywood Reporter.

‘West Hollywood’ magazine feature

Alison Martino's Vintage Los Angeles 
Vintage Los Angeles is a labor of love,” Alison said. “It is a daily celebration and a historical resource that draws people from all over the world. It’s the next best thing to a time machine.”

What's Happening with Vintage Los Angeles

What’s Happening with Vintage Los Angeles?

9 hours ago

Vintage Los Angeles

NBC's Sign Off from 1985

"Wishing you all a good night"
...

 

Comment on Facebook

How many of you immediately think of Poltergeist?

An insomniac's worst nightmare. lol.

Even back in the 60's, I'd just switch to KCOP 13 and watch whatever crappy science fiction (It! The Terror from Beyond Space) or film noir movie Cal Worthington was sponsoring. To this day I STILL hate the Dutch angle... I always got dizzy tilting my head.

In the mid 60's... one station would have... Movies Til-Dawn... . Hard to believe that even in the mid 80's..that TV went off the air... . As a kid I liked all night radio shows.... with people calling in telling ghost stories or something.. .

Something about that lilt in "Goodnight!" makes it seem so genuine — like he knew some poor saps were up so late that they're up early and he truly wished them well.

And this is where I was awakened with a start!

Being raised in Tulsa, OK, I was lucky to have a wonderful ABC affiliate KTUL that had a great creative staff and wonderful promotion team. This was their sign off in the 70s; Chief Dick West signing The Lord’s Prayer. Still gives me chills. youtu.be/UReVVrbL8xs

Do you have any other late night KNBC announcer videos? I was friends with another one of them, Gene Knight.

I also liked the High Flight sign off (KTLA?). That takes me back.

KNBC.....those were the days.

Does anyone know when stations stopped going off the air like this?

I miss goodnight l.a. waaaay b,,4 m t v

I loved the sign offs.

What? No national anthem?

Cool

And this is where I was awakened with a start!

I wonder how many.. "Youngers" understand Poltergeist these days...

These are cool. Before my time... youtu.be/ps1FwDI09Gk

Go back to sleep...https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ir9Q7gzOoz8

👍

+ View previous comments

11 hours ago

Vintage Los Angeles

VIntage Logos!

Did any of these actually scare you growing up? Or did you find them exciting? Like something REALLY EVENTFUL was about to take place!
...

 

Comment on Facebook

I must add that my cat ran out of the room as I was uploading this. He was terrified of the “screen gems” synthesizer sounds and SPLIT...ears pinned back, spazed out fluffy tail and all!!

The CBS special logo always meant something exciting was going to be on— usually Charlie Brown!

When you saw this intro, you knew something good was coming on.

Mark Vll always got me. I always thought the guy was going to hit his hand!

Same as VS Levin and Michael. I love all of these and the HBO one is spectacular. But, th Outer Limits opening did scare me, as a little guy.

Haha Alison , didn’t you say one of them scared you?

Entertainment presents I association with the Muppet show ..

I was obsessed by logos and theme songs. The only thing that scared me was, "we interrupt this broadcast to bring you the following news bulletin." My heart would beat fast, my blood pressure would rise, and tears would come to my eyes. To me it meant that either the president was shot or we had just declared war. I lived for the NBC Peacock and years later, I fell head over heals for the HBO theme.

Spinning CBS meant that Charlie Brown was coming on!!!! Love all of these! Such great memories!!

Some of these are making me feel like I may need to go to therapy tomorrow...

It’s comforting to watch these.

The Rankin/Bass logo is etched in my brain for animated Christmas programs.

The LBS Communications used to scare me only because it was right after Tales From The Darkside.

I was scared by the PBS Logo, the Pinball Viacom Logo and the Paramount Logo when I was growing up.

Mark VII Limited scared me. I always imagined that man was in prison.

The CBS Eye from the early 60s scared me. It came after the Twilight Zone episodes.

Logos never scared me. The theme from Medical Center used to scare the hell out of me.

Wasn’t there a guy who used to hit a gong?

Love Logos! The Viacom V of Doom was always a little troubling for me, though.

Thanks to whoever came up with this video compilation because it definitely brings back memories. The Rankin Bass ending brings back Christmas Memories because it was the ending for the "Twas the Night Before Christmas" cartoon.

When I'd see the "ITC" logo it was time for Thunderbirds, baby!

Only the Outer Limits opening worried me.

Interesting... I wound up working on shows for 10 of the 16 organizations shown.

No fear. Didn’t pay too much attention to them but after watching them all I remember all of them so I guess they were effective.

OMG! The nostalgia! The Screen Gems always confused me as a kid. I remember asking my dad what the dancing sticks meant. 🤔

+ View previous comments

12 hours ago

Vintage Los Angeles

1970s Flashback

HOT BUTTER - POP CORNyoutube.com
...

Video image

 

Comment on Facebook

Reminds me of several other wonderful instrumentals: “Auld Lang Syne (The Millenium Mix)” by Kenny G 2000 “Theme from Mission: Impossible” by Adam Clayton & Larry Mullen 1996 “Songbird” by Kenny G 1987 “Miami Vice Theme” by Jan Hammer 1985 “Axel F” by Harold Faltermeyer 1985 “Chariots of Fire” by Vangelis 1982 “Hooked On Classics” by Royal Philharmonic Orchestra 1981 “The Theme from ‘Hill Street Blues’” by Mike Post 1981 “Rise” by Herb Alpert 1979 “Music Box Dancer” by Frank Mills 1979“Feels So Good” by Chuck Mangione 1978 “Star Wars (Main Title)” by John Williams & the London Symphony Orchestra 1977 “Star Wars Theme/Cantina Band” by Meco 1977 “Gonna Fly Now (Theme from ‘Rocky’)” by Bill Conti & His Orchestra 1977 “Nadia’s Theme (‘The Young & the Restless’)” by Barry DeVorzon & Perry Botkin, Jr. 1976 “A Fifth of Beethoven” by Walter Murphy & the Big Apple Band 1976 “Theme from ‘S.W.A.T.’” by Rhythm Heritage 1976 “The Rockford Files” by Mike Post 1975 “The Hustle” by Van McCoy 1975 “Pick Up the Pieces” by the Average White Band 1974 “Express” by B.T. Express 1975 “Love’s Theme” by the Love Unlimited Orchestra 1973 “Dynomite (Part 1)” by Tony Camillo’s Bazuka 1975 “Space Race” by Billy Preston 1973 “Hocus Pocus” by Focus 1973 “Frankenstein” by the Edgar Winter Group 1973 “Also Sprach Zarathustra (Theme from ‘2001’)” by Deodato 1973 “TSOP (The Sound of Philadelphia)” by MFSB featuring the Three Degrees 1974 “The Entertainer” by Marvin Hamlisch 1974 “Rock and Roll (Part 2)” by Gary Glitter 1972 “Outa-Space” by Billy Preston 1972 “Jungle Fever” by the Chakachas 1972 “Joy” by Apollo 100 1972 “Scorpio” by Dennis Coffey & the Detroit Guitar Band 1972 “Midnight Cowboy” by Ferrante & Teicher 1969 “Love Theme from ‘Romeo & Juliet’” by Henry Mancini & His Orchestra 1969 “Time Is Tight” by Booker T. & the MG’s 1969 “Hawaii Five-O” by the Ventures 1969 “Soulful Strut” by Young-Holt Unlimited 1968 “Hang ‘Em High” by Booker T. & The MG’s 1968 “Classical Gas” by Mason Williams 1968 “Grazing in the Grass” by Hugh Masekela 1968 “The Horse” by Cliff Nobles & Co 1968 “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly” by Hugo Montenegro & His Orchestra 1968 “Love Is Blue” by Paul Mauriat & His Orchestra 1968 “No Matter What Shape (Your Stomach’s In)” by the T-Bones 1965 “A Taste of Honey” by Herb Alpert & The Tijuana Brass 1965 “The ‘In’ Crowd” by the Ramsey Lewis Trio 1965 “Cast Your Fate to the Wind” by Sounds Orchestral 1965

Omg didn’t think anyone else knew about this crazy song! My Uncle ran a juke box business and gave me all kinds of 45’s this was one. My sister and I used to play this on my Grandma’s hi-fi record player and run and skip around in her house. Drove her crazy she hated this song. 😂😂😂

I sort of remember this being used for a coffee commercial on TV where it showed a percolator bubbling coffee in the glass dome at the type while this song played......or maybe I'm just getting old and imagining it lol.

Simpler times!

I have this song on a 45 somewhere....

I rather listen to it than watch this atrocity video. Sorry for this. www.youtube.com/watch?v=YfdLh0MHqKw

One of the worst earworms I've ever known.

Had this song on a k-tel album!

I remember hearing it between shows on KCET way back when. No picture on the screen, just the music.

Well I, myself, see no audio or visual quality regarding this post. I would rather chase packman around the screen. At least the visual image is interactive and the audio portion of packman is more appealing. Oh well, so much for my view of this techno crap

I had to find that airline commercial! youtu.be/LU6t8GidFtY

I really like the other one!

Dave Don

Rick Cotta

Jennifer...remember learning a dance to this in elementary school during square dancing?!

Nicole Johnston Terry Thurm Costello

Omg I have this on my iPod

Wild.way to start the day.

+ View previous comments

15 hours ago

Vintage Los Angeles

Life before massive parking structures and ticket validations.

Farmers Market, 1950s
...

Life before massive parking structures and ticket validations. 

Farmers Market, 1950s

 

Comment on Facebook

In the 1950s, there was a pet shop, and sitting on a perch outside the entrance to the pet shop was a parrot named Alice.

Remember the wood baskets with wheels?

Judging by the cars, just a few years later I was living right around the corner on Orange Street.

I miss the old Farmer’s Market and hate all the modern crap that’s there now. And I was born in 1980!

Used to love going there in the late 70’s with my grandmother. It was a favorite place for her!!

what is that blue stuff in the skies?

Remember Dad parking the Hudson right in front of Du-Par's? The baseball field?

I remember well the old Farmers Market & across the street from Town & Country Mkt as well as Gilmore Field & the Gilmore Drive-In movie theater where the PCL Hollywood Stars played...

Loved it in the 70s and 80s too.

YA GLOBALISM. Pretty ironic considering everywhere that supposed environmentalist live always end up looking like concrete smoggy hellholes.

I really would have loved to been around in the 40s and 50s. But my parents, selfish people they were, didn’t bring me in til 1960. 😆

I love 💘the old cars Alison! 👍😇😉! Thanks for posting these! 😉😀😀😉!

I first went there in the ‘50s, then a bunch ‘’60-‘62 when we lived in LA. Loved the donut shop and magic shops best!

As soon as you saw that spire, you knew there was plenty of good food for the pickins! I remember the guy who ground up the fresh horseradish. He had on a gas mask and rubber gloves. He said some of the varieties of horseradish that he had was so strong it would cause blisters on the skin if the juice got on you. Then there was the onion lady....selling a bazillion types of onions. Never knew there were so many types!

My sister and I met there for dinner after work every Thursday. We probably had tacos! Yum! The best I ever had!

We went there several times in the early 60’s on grade school field trips (from the OC). First the museums or tar pits, then the FM. So fun.

Open space on the hills in the background.

Of course, Loteria wasn't there yet, either. The FM giveth, the FM taketh away.

It was so neat and quaint before The Grove!!!

I was first there in August 1973, on my honeymoon. We met up with a friend of my wife's who was an LA native and had returned after school. She spent 2 days playing tourist with us and the Farmers Market looked about like this.

Actually I wonder is this the same Farmers Market used in the 1st part of the final episode of "The Fugitive" ? Kimble with the help of Jean Carlisle (Diane Baker) evades the police and it takes place in a Farmers Market.

Back in the early 60's my family started to go to Chris'.....now Charlies'.....for the thick french toast breakfast....still go there when ever my brother comes into town......but now you have to get there early.....before 9 AM......and never on the weekends......

I love that yellow and tan 1950 Pontiac Catalina. My dad restored on back in the early 80's Straight 8 engine. They were a beautiful car.

Next to Pike Place Market, where I live, in Seattle...I love this Farmer's Market! I admit, I like the modern day shops that are also there now.

I spent a lot of Sunday afternoons there as a youngster with family in the 50's and 60's. Loved it there.

+ View previous comments

Load more

Alison MartinoVLA Home